Posts Tagged ‘R’n’B’

Song of the Day by Eric Berman – The Jukebox Series #8 – Luther Ingram: “If Loving You Is Wrong (I Don’t Want To Be Right)” b/w Hot Butter: “Popcorn” – Collectables Records Double A-Sided 45 RPM Single COL-3170 (O1/P1)

45-adapter-logo2lutheringram

Song of the Day by Eric Berman – The Jukebox Series #8 – Luther Ingram: “If Loving You Is Wrong (I Don’t Want To Be Right)” b/w Hot Butter: “Popcorn” – Collectables Records Double A-Sided 45 RPM Single COL-3170 (O1/P1)

Today’s classic comes from a double A-sided reissue single on the Collectables record label released specifically for jukeboxes featuring two big hits by two different artists. Most of the records in the juke are original pressings, however this was the only copy of Ingram’s soul classic I could find at the time I was looking, plus having two hit singles by two different artists on one record is indeed a bonus.

The A-Side of today’s double-sided single is Luther Ingram’s infidelity ballad “If Loving You Is Wrong (I Don’t Want To Be Right),” which is one of the greatest soul singles of all time! The song was written by STAX songwriters Homer Banks, Carl Hampton and Raymond Jackson. Banks also wrote the Sam And Dave classic “I Can’t Stand Up For Falling Down,” and billed as “We Three” with Raymond Jackson and Bettye Crutcher, wrote Johnnie Taylor’s “Who’s Making Love” and The Staple Singers’ “If You’re Ready (Come Go With Me).”

“If Loving You Is Wrong” was originally recorded in 1970 by The Emotions with an up-tempo arrangement that didn’t serve the song well. As a result, the record was left on the shelves of STAX records unreleased. Luther Ingram moved to Memphis after several failed attempts at a recording career in New York City and signed a recording contract with the KoKo label which was distributed by STAX Records. With the label, he found success scoring the top-ten R&B hit “Ain’t That Loving You (For More Reasons Than One)” in 1970.

While at STAX, Ingram discovered The Emotions’ version of “If Loving You Is Wrong” and rearranged and recorded the song as a mournful ballad. His version topped the R&B charts and rose to the number three position on the pop charts in 1972, selling over four million copies.

The song has been covered by a plethora of artists including Isaac Hayes, Rod Stewart, Percy Sledge, Bobby “Blue” Bland, Ramsey Lewis and Cassandra Wilson. Millie Jackson’s 1974 chart version of the song was expanded into an eleven minute suite complete with a spoken “rap” which was nominated for two Grammy Awards. Barbara Mandrell also scored a country hit with her rendition of the song in 1978.

If all Ingram did in music was to give us this signature recording, his stature would be sealed as an R&B great, however Ingram was also the co-writer(with Mark Rice) of The Staple Singers’ empowerment anthem “Respect Yourself.”

The flip of this double A-sided single is “Popcorn” by Hot Butter. “Popcorn” is a bubbly electronic confection composed by German musician Gershon Kingsley who was known for his work composing classical and Broadway music, and writing TV commercial jingles. Kingsley recorded the influential electronic album The In Sound from Way Out! with Jean-Jaques Perrey for Vanguard Records in 1966. The album promoted the use of synthesizers in pop music years before German recording artists Can and Kraftwerk.

Kingsley first recorded “Popcorn” for his 1969 album Music To Moog By, and then recorded the song again in 1971 with his First Moog Quartet. Stan Free was a member of The First Moog Quartet and re-recorded the song in 1972 under the name Hot Butter.

Hot Butter’s record came out during the moog craze of the early 1970s that saw classical records by the likes of Walter/Wendy Carlos (Switched On Bach) and Isao Tomita (Snowflakes Are Dancing) cross over to the pop charts and sell millions of copies. Hot Butter’s recording was one of the first all-electronic records to chart on the Billboard Hot Singles Chart, peaking at #9 pop and #4 on the adult contemporary charts.

The song was not named for popcorn that you eat; rather it was an amalgam of “pop” for pop music and “corn” for the kitsch and novelty of the recording. It has been covered by the likes of Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass, Jean Michel Jarre, Arthur Fiedler & The Boston Pops, James Last, Norrie Paramour, Ronnie Aldrich and The Muppets.

Kingsley also wrote the music used by Disney theme parks for its Main Street Electrical Parade and the theme from the TV game show The Joker’s Wild.

“The Jukebox Series” focuses on the 80 records that inhabit my 1963 Seeburg LPC1 jukebox. I’ve had my jukebox (or as I like to call it “the prehistoric iPod”) for a little over fourteen years and in that time I’d like to think that I’ve perfected the mix of 45s within.

Edited: March 23rd, 2015

Song of the Day by Eric Berman – “Dancing Machine” by The Jackson 5

45ADAPTERjackson5

Song of the Day by Eric Berman – “Dancing Machine” by The Jackson 5

They were growing up…but the world liked their Jacksons young.

By 1973, The Jackson 5 were becoming somewhat of a spent force around Motown. It had been a few years since the group scored a bona-fide top ten hit, and there was plenty of dissatisfaction to go around.

Brother Michael was no longer the pint-sized dynamo that he once was. He was now a pimply 15 years old geek with a much deeper voice. Motown had been grooming him as a solo star much to the detriment of his singing brothers, and between 1971 and 1973 he scored several substantial solo hits including the top five smash “Got To Be There,” “Ben” which was a chart topping hit about a rat from the movie Willard, a cover of the Bobby Day hit “Rockin’ Robin” which climbed to the #2 position on the charts and “I Wanna Be Where You Are,” which went to #16 on the pop charts and #2 on the rhythm and blues charts.

Meanwhile, some of the other brothers were also branching out. Jermaine released a solo record in 1972 that included a cover of the Shep & The Limelites’ hit “Daddy’s Home” which rose up to the top ten of the charts, and Jackie also released solo record the following year. All of this activity was beginning to play on the dynamic within the group in negative ways.

What the group collectively craved most was more control over what they recorded, and more involvement in the making of their records. While they were writing, producing and playing songs in their home studio, Motown wouldn’t let them play on their own records insisting that they use the Motown house band, The Funk Brothers, or The Wrecking Crew (for West Coast sessions). Not only that, they were only allowed to record songs that were chosen for them by “The Corporation.”

Changes needed to be made, and it was within this atmosphere of disillusion that the group’s father and manager, Joe Jackson began to look for a new record deal for his charges.

The group’s 1973 album, GIT: Get It Together, was the first Jackson 5 album to feature lead vocals by each brother. The album also found the group dipping their collective toes into disco waters by segueing all the songs together in order to provide a non-stop mix of music for dancing.

By far, the best song of the album is today’s Song of the Day by Eric Berman, “Dancing Machine.” The song was an “automatic, systematic” call to the dance floor featuring syncopated funky rhythms and terrific vocal interplay between Michael and the rest of the group who traded off lead vocal lines and sang backup on the track. It was also one of the first songs that Michael employed the vocal hiccup that would end up being one of his lasting trademarks.

Like “Billy Jean” and the moonwalk, “Dancing Machine” also benefitted by an accompanying dance move which helped propel it up the charts. When the group appeared on Soul Train to promote the album, Michael Jackson was seen doing the robot dance resulting in a spectacle that left fans wanting more.

The song was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1975 for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals, but lost out to Rufus’s hit “Tell Me Something Good.” While the other seven tracks on the record were less commercial, the title track was a moderate hit that charted at #28 on the singles charts, and “Hum Along and Dance” became a popular favorite in the group’s live act.

Shortly after the release of the album, the group found themselves riding high in the charts again as background vocalists on Stevie Wonder’s 1974 single “You Haven’t Done Nothin’” from his Fulfillingness’ First Finale album.

The group signed with CBS/Epic Records in 1975 and had to change their name to The Jacksons, since Motown owned the rights to the Jackson 5 name. Jermaine chose to stay on at Motown since he was married to Berry Gordy’s daughter, and was replaced by the youngest Jackson brother, Randy.

While the group’s commercial prospects at CBS weren’t much better, Michael eventually scored a huge hit with the 1979 album Off the Wall, and then came Thriller and The Victory Tour, and Jackson mania swept the world again…

Edited: December 11th, 2014

Song of the Day by Eric Berman – “I Got Loaded” by Little Bob and the Lollipops

45ADAPTERlittlebob2

Song of the Day by Eric Berman – “I Got Loaded” by Little Bob and the Lollipops

For many years, I thought this song was a Los Lobos original. Their version was so in line with their sound and it fit so well on their Will the Wolf Survive album. So it was surprising to me, when I found out that the song had been around for over twenty years by the time they got around to recording it.

The song was recorded by Little Bob and the Lollipops, and was never even originally released as the A-side to the single it appeared on. When originally released in 1965 on the La Louisianne record label (best known for Bob and Dale’s hit “I’m Leaving It All Up to You”), it was the flip of the single “Nobody But You.” Over the years, the song has become Little Bob’s signature song and has inspired covers by the likes of Robert Cray, Tab Benoit and The Refreshments.

Little Bob (born Camille Bob) grew up working on a farm in rural Prairie Laurent, Louisiana. Early on he took a liking to the music of B.B. King, Count Basie and Guitar Slim, and dreamed of a day when he could give up working in the fields and play music for a living. To that end, he traded a horse for his first set of drums as a teen, and set out on his music career.

By 1955, he was backing Good Rockin’ Bob (aka Ed Thomas) and making more money than he ever would have if he’d stayed on the farm. Growing restless as a backing musician, Bob decided to break out on his own, and formed Little Bob and the Lollipops in the late 1950s, naming the group after Cookie and the Cupcakes. The band soon became a fixture on the Louisiana party and club circuit, playing a rocking hybrid of rock ‘n’ roll and rhythm and blues.

His early singles “Are You Ever Coming Home,” “Please Don’t Leave” and “You Don’t Have to Cry” were Cajun-infused rhythm and blues. After signing with Carol Rachou’s La Louisianne label, Bob’s records took on more of a James Brown influence, as heard on the later singles “Are You Going My Way,” “I Can’t Take It” and “Look Out Mr. Heartache.”

Little Bob has been performing for over 50 years and was elected into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame in 1992. Both Little Bob and the La Louisianne record label are both still active today.

Word to the wise: Take two aspirin and drink a big glass of water after listenin’ to this one!

Edited: November 5th, 2014

Song of the Day by Eric Berman – “Soldier of Love (Lay Down Your Arms)” by Arthur Alexander

45ADAPTERarthuralexandersoldieroflove

Song of the Day by Eric Berman – “Soldier of Love (Lay Down Your Arms)” by Arthur Alexander

He’s the only artist to be covered by the holy quartet of Elvis Presley, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan. Others who rushed to his deep well of first-rate copyrights included The Hollies, Ry Cooder, Pearl Jam, Ike & Tina Turner, Marshall Crenshaw, George Jones, Otis Redding, The Bee Gees, Humble Pie, and Dusty Springfield, and that’s only a small sampling of those who have recorded his tunes.

Yet, Arthur Alexander, the man who wrote such classics as “Anna (Go To Him),” “You Better Move On,” “Sally Sue Brown,” “Detroit City,” “A Shot Of Rhythm And Blues” and today’s Song of the Day by Eric Berman, remains largely unknown to most people, or even worse, totally forgotten.

And if his recordings weren’t enough to guarantee him legendary status, he, along with Donnie Fritts, Rick Hall and Tom Stafford, converted a dilapidated tobacco warehouse in Alabama into a recording studio, and launched the famed Muscle Shoals Studios with his first single “You Better Move On” in the early 1960s.

The music business was a tricky proposition then as it is now, and fame and fortune largely alluded him, but not for lack of trying. After a string of seminal southern soul recordings that made others rich and famous, Alexander moved from record label to record label releasing a series of albums and singles throughout the sixties and seventies that garnered little or no airplay, including an eponymously titled album for Warner Brothers in 1972 and the 1975 minor hit single “Every Day I Have To Cry” for the Buddah label.

From 1977 through 1992, Alexander dropped out of the music industry completely and drove a van for senior citizens. After being inducted into the Alabama Music Hall of Fame, he came back to music and recorded his last record, Lonely Just like Me for Elektra records in 1993. Sadly days after launching his comeback with a new band, Alexander died of a heart attack.

For further listening, check out The Ultimate Arthur Alexander for his original recordings, and the tribute album Adios Amigo: A Tribute to Arthur Alexander featuring covers of his songs by the likes of Robert Plant, Elvis Costello, Roger McGuinn, Nick Lowe, John Prine and Frank Black. Both CDs were issued by Razor & Tie music and are essential.

Edited: November 4th, 2014

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Think” by The 5 Royales

45ADAPTER5-Royales

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Think” by The 5 Royales

If ever a group deserved to be in the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall Of Fame, it should be The 5 Royales.

Not only were they a pioneering R’n’B and Doo Wop vocal group, but they had one of the greatest songwriters of the era in Lowman “Pete” Pauling as a member. Pauling wrote most of the Royales’ material and many of their songs went on to be big hits for others.

The 5 Royales were formed in North Carolina in the early 1950s and consisted of Lowman “Pete” Pauling, Jimmy Moore, Obadiah Carter, Otto Jeffries and Johnny Tanner. They recorded for King Records and had chart success with songs like “Monkey Hips And Rice,” “Baby Don’t Do It” and “Somebody Help Me.” But it was the songs that were penned by Pauling and recorded by others that really made them legends.

The group was responsible for introducing today’s Song Of The Day that later went on to be a big soul hit for James Brown. They also recorded the original versions of “Dedicated To The One I Love” made famous by both The Shirelles and The Mamas & The Papas, and “Tell The Truth” which was originally recorded by Ray Charles.

Edited: June 19th, 2014

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – The Jukebox Series #8 – Luther Ingram: “If Loving You Is Wrong (I Don’t Want To Be Right)” b/w Hot Butter: “Popcorn” – Collectables Records Double A-Sided 45 RPM Single COL-3170 (O1/P1)

lutheringram001hotbutterpopcorn

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – The Jukebox Series #8 – Luther Ingram: “If Loving You Is Wrong (I Don’t Want To Be Right)” b/w Hot Butter: “Popcorn” – Collectables Records Double A-Sided 45 RPM Single COL-3170 (O1/P1)

“The Jukebox Series” focuses on the 80 records that inhabit my 1963 Seeburg LPC1 jukebox. I’ve had my jukebox (or as I like to call it “the prehistoric iPod”) for a little over twelve years and in that time I’d like to think that I’ve perfected the mix of 45s within.

Today’s classic comes from a double A-sided reissue single on the Collectables record label released specifically for jukeboxes featuring two big hits by two different artists. Most of the records in the juke are original pressings, however this was the only copy of Ingram’s soul classic I could find at the time I was looking, plus having two hit singles by two different artists on one record is indeed a bonus.

The A-Side of today’s double-sided single is Luther Ingram’s infidelity ballad “If Loving You Is Wrong (I Don’t Want To Be Right),” which is one of the greatest soul singles of all time! The song was written by STAX songwriters Homer Banks, Carl Hampton and Raymond Jackson. Banks also wrote the Sam And Dave classic “I Can’t Stand Up For Falling Down,” and billed as “We Three” with Raymond Jackson and Bettye Crutcher, wrote Johnnie Taylor’s “Who’s Making Love” and The Staple Singers’ “If You’re Ready (Come Go With Me).”

“If Loving You Is Wrong” was originally recorded in 1970 by The Emotions with an up-tempo arrangement that didn’t serve the song well. As a result, the record was left on the shelves of STAX records unreleased. Luther Ingram moved to Memphis after several failed attempts at a recording career in New York City and signed a recording contract with the KoKo label which was distributed by STAX Records. With the label, he found success scoring the top-ten R&B hit “Ain’t That Loving You (For More Reasons Than One)” in 1970.

While at STAX, Ingram discovered The Emotions’ version of “If Loving You Is Wrong” and rearranged and recorded the song as a mournful ballad. His version topped the R&B charts and rose to the number 3 position on the pop charts in 1972, selling over four million copies.

The song has been covered by a plethora of artists including Isaac Hayes, Rod Stewart, Percy Sledge, Bobby “Blue” Bland, Ramsey Lewis and Cassandra Wilson. Millie Jackson’s 1974 chart version of the song was expanded into an eleven minute suite complete with a spoken “rap” which was nominated for two Grammy Awards. Barbara Mandrell also scored a country hit with her rendition of the song in 1978.

If all Ingram did in music was to give us this signature recording, his stature would be sealed as an R& B great, however Ingram was also the co-writer(with Mark Rice) of The Staple Singers’ empowerment anthem “Respect Yourself.”

The flip of this double A-sided single is “Popcorn” by Hot Butter. “Popcorn” was a bubbly electronic confection composed by German musician Gershon Kingsley who was known for his work composing classical and Broadway music, and writing TV commercial jingles. Kingsley recorded the influential electronic album The In Sound from Way Out! with Jean-Jaques Perrey for Vanguard Records in 1966. The album promoted the use of synthesizers in pop music years before German recording artists Can and Kraftwerk.

Kingsley first recorded “Popcorn” for his 1969 album Music To Moog By, and then recorded the song again in 1971 with his First Moog Quartet. Stan Free was a member of The First Moog Quartet and re-recorded the song in 1972 under the name Hot Butter.

Hot Butter’s record came out during the moog craze of the early 1970s that saw classical records by the likes of Walter/Wendy Carlos (Switched On Bach) and Isao Tomita (Snowflakes Are Dancing) cross over to the pop charts and sell millions of copies.  Hot Butter’s recording was one of the first all-electronic records to chart on the Billboard Hot Singles Chart, peaking at #9 pop and #4 on the adult contemporary charts.

The song was not named for popcorn that you eat; rather it was an amalgam of “pop” for pop music and “corn” for the kitsch and novelty of the recording. It has been covered by the likes of Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass, Jean Michel Jarre, Arthur Fiedler & The Boston Pops, James Last, Norrie Paramour, Ronnie Aldrich and The Muppets.

Kingsley also wrote the music used by Disney theme parks for its Main Street Electrical Parade and the theme from the TV game show The Joker’s Wild.

Edited: October 16th, 2013

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – 6/30/13

45 adapterbobbybland

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “36-22-36” by Bobby “Blue” Bland

Thirteen hours in a car, from Chicago to West Orange, New Jersey. Some would think of this mammoth road trip as a major drag…I see it as a golden opportunity for some uninterrupted music listening!

Typically, I like to start long road trips with newer music I’m less familiar with, and as the miles and the hours roll on, I turn to what I like to call “musical comfort food” (or music that I’m very familiar with) to enjoyably pass the time.

We got on the road at 3:30am central time and began with the new Jeff Tweedy-produced Mavis Staples album called One True Vine. It was the perfect way to start the trip, nothing too rocking for the wee hours, and only a 35 minute time investment that includes her cover of Funkadelic’s “Can You Get To That,” plus several new Jeff Tweedy numbers.

Second up was Unorthodox Jukebox by Bruno Mars. Yeah, I know, he’s soooo commercial and very poppy, but I think he writes good songs and it was a fun spin.

We followed this with the new album from Laura Marling called Once I Was An Eagle. Marling is a British singer/songwriter who is often compared to Joni Mitchell. Well, those are mighty big shoes to fill, and while Marling is not the caliber songwriter as Mitchell, her sound is truly reminiscent. The album, her third, is also here longest platter and while I do like her music, the record outwore its welcome before it ended. That said, I did persevere to the end and found it rewarding anyway.

Next up was an audience recording of Wilco’s Solid Sound all-covers, all-request show that took place in Massachusetts this past Saturday. Highlights of this great show include their cover of “Marquee Moon” by Television, The Beatles’ “And Your Bird Can Sing,” “Don’t Fear The Reaper” by Blue Oyster Cult and an off the cuff take of Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky.” And best of all, the concert burned over two hours of the trip leading us to a breakfast stop and change of drivers.

Vicki’s choice from behind the wheel was a 4th Of July playlist I made several years ago that includes such “patriotic” favorites as Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land,” “4th Of July” by both Aimee Mann and X, “Saturday In The Park” by Chicago, “Young Americans” by David Bowie, “Don’t Pull It Down” (“Crazy for the blue, white, red and yellow”) from the musical Hair, “America” from West Side Story, Neil Diamond’s “America,” Paul Simon’s “American Tune,” “Ragged Old Flag” by Johnny Cash, “U.S. Blues” by Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix’s “Star Spangled Banner,” and several others.

Last week, the music world suffered from a seismic loss in the form of Bobby “Blue” Bland. As a result, we played two of the six CDs that make up his complete Peacock recordings, including today’s Song Of The Day, “Turn On Your Lovelight,” “St. James Infirmary,” “Blues In The Night,” “Stormy Monday Blues,” and about 40 more powerful R’n’B tracks.

From there, it was on to more musical comfort food in the form of Elvis Presley’s Memphis Album including “Power Of Love,” “In The Ghetto,” “Suspicious Mind,” “Don’t Cry Daddy,” “Any Day Now,” “Long Black Limousine,” “Rubberneckin’,” and many more, in an essential 23-track collection of Presley recordings from 1969.

This led us to Steve Earle’s latest record The Low Highway, which is one of the best records to come out all year, followed by more comfort food courtesy of George Harrison’s All Things Must Pass (minus the Apple Jam record).

It’s been a long time since All Things Must Pass has received an airing from me, and it’s never sounded better. Sure, everybody knows “My Sweet Lord,” “Wah Wah” and “What Is Life,” but the real stars of this show are tracks like “Let It Down,” “Apple Scruffs,” “Behind The Locked Door,” “I’d Have You Anytime,” ”Beware Of Darkness,” and the album’s title track. It’s also hard to believe that songs like “Isn’t It A Pity” and “All Things Must Pass” were worked up by The Beatles during the Let It Be sessions and were left off the album in favor of “Dig It” and “Maggie Mae.” Go figure…

Our ride came to an end before Joe Cocker’s Woodstock performance, our last musical choice of the day did. Like anything else, good music makes time fly, and I’m thankful for my completely stuffed 160 gig iPod to get me through.

I’m bushed, and will be posting mostly repeated posts during the rest of the week.

Edited: June 29th, 2013

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – 4/4/13

 

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Pusher Love Girl” by Justin Timberlake

Growing up in public is nothing new. Sammy Davis, Jr. did it. So did Stevie Wonder and Michael Jackson. Heck, even Justin Bieber’s doing it now. Some have handled it better than others, and while it’s probably not the easiest thing to do, there are some that make it seem effortless.

Justin Timberlake is one of them. He’s the total package…actor, comedian, singer, musician, fashion plate, record label honcho, business man…he’s got it all!

Timberlake’s career began at age 11 when he sang country tunes on Star Search under the name Jason Randall. From there, he went on to become a cast member of The New Mickey Mouse Club along with Britney Spears, Christina Aguilera, JC Chasez and Ryan Gosling.

His career really took off when he joined the boy band, ‘N Sync (along with JC Chasez). Worldwide success ensued with record breaking tours, smash hit singles like “Bye Bye Bye,” “That I Promise You,” “Girlfriend,” “Gone,” “Tearin’ Up My Heart” and “It’s Gonna Be Me,” and the chart-topping albums No Strings Attached and Celebrity.

But what would happen to young JT once ‘N Sync’s popularity waned? Could he make it in music? Perhaps he could go back to the medium of TV. It was a crap shoot as to whether he’d even have a career at all. Look at the rest of ‘N Sync, and the members of New Kids On The Block for that matter. Where are they now?

No worries, Justin Timberlake took the bull, and the opportunities, by the horn and let his talent lead the way by releasing his first solo album Justified in 2002. The album was not only a critical success, but it also spawned the hit singles “Like I Love You,” “Senorita,” “Cry Me A River” and “Rock Your Body.”

In the meantime, our golden boy recorded with everybody from Madonna and Duran Duran to 50 Cent and Lil Wayne, which just added to his allure and credibility. A movie career ensued, including parts in The Social Network, Bad Teacher, In Time, Friends With Benefits, Alpha Dog, Black Snake Moan and Shrek the Third, and he mostly got good notices too!

He emerged pretty much unscathed from his participation in the Super Bowl wardrobe malfunction that caught Janet Jackson with her breast exposed to over 100 million people. Then came his second album, FutureSex/LoveSounds where he singlehandedly brought sexy back to the top of the charts, and with Andy Samberg and The Lonely Island he also brought bawdy back to the television airwaves with “D**k In A Box” and its companion piece “Motherlover” on Saturday Night Live. He recently became a member of the “Five Timers Club” for hosting that show five times.

And so with great fanfare, Justin Timberlake announced his return to music this year after a seven year layoff with The 20/20 Experience, and it is a stunner of a record. The album features ten long song-suites that have as much in common with Paul McCartney’s “Band On The Run” and “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” as they do with the retro soul music of Michael Jackson and Stevie Wonder, and the dance music that is currently all over the charts today.

With sturdy production by Timbaland, his trusted companion in music, The 20/20 Experience is both totally up to date and retro at the same time.

Many of the songs have long codas, abrupt rhythm changes and elongated vamps that take them into many different directions, like today’s Song Of The Day which switches gears half way through, and “Strawberry Bubblegum,” whose coda comes straight from the Stevie Wonder playbook. All of the songs revolve around metaphors for love and sex, as drugs in “Pusher Love Girl,” candy in “Strawberry Bubblegum” and even space travel in “Spaceship Coupe” (with room for two and making love on the moon).

There’s the deep soul grind of “That Girl” that is punctuated by a great rhythm guitar and horn part, and Timberlake is at his most Michael Jackson on the dance floor shaker “Let The Groove Get In.” Barry White is channeled on the retro string intro of “Pusher Love Girl,” as well as during the opening vamp of “Strawberry Bubblegum” and throughout “Hold The Wall.” While the backbeat on “Suit & Tie” is very reminiscent of Marvin Gaye’s “Mercy Mercy Me.” The proceedings come to a close with the album’s sole atmospheric ballad, “Blue Ocean Floor” which ends things on a meditative note.

While some of the songs tend to ponder on a little too long at times, for the most part Timberlake has delivered his most consistent effort yet. Stay tuned for the second ten songs of The 20/20 Experience coming out this November…

Edited: April 3rd, 2013

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – 12/3/12

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Crazy” by Bettye LaVette

Summer of 2006…the only song you heard ANYWHERE was “Crazy” by Gnarls Barkley. The song was so prevalent, that while at Lollapalooza that August, no less than three bands performed it as part of their sets – The Raconteurs, Violent Femmes and, of course, Gnarls Barkley. Cee Lo Green has one of the greatest soul voices (especially on this song), and his slot with Barkley-mate Danger Mouse was one of the weekend’s most anticipated sets. The song was a worldwide number one smash and it set and broke all kinds of download records in the then-burgeoning world of digital music. One would think it would be pretty hard to top Gnarl’s version of the song, but soul legend Bettye LaVette has recorded it for one of the most satisfying records released all year, her ”Thankful N’ Thoughtful” album, and she nails it. LaVette’s career began all the way back in 1962 with the top-ten hit “My Man – He’s A Lovin’ Man” and the 1965 top-twenty hit “Let Me Down Easy,” before sinking into obscurity for forty years. Since 2005 she’s recorded four excellent albums for the Anti record label, mostly consisting of well-chosen covers by her and her producer Craig Street. This is her inventive take of the now-classic Gnarls track, hear her make it her own for yourself.

Edited: December 2nd, 2012

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – 8/5/12

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Take Me Back” by Aloe Blacc – Lollapalooza Recap Day 2

The sad truth about day two of Lollapalooza was the storm that evacuated the festival and closed it down for several crucial hours during the afternoon cancelling sets by Alabama Shakes and truncating sets by tUnE-yArDs and many others. Before the rain came, the day showed some promise including a terrific set by Aloe Blacc whose “Good Things” album has been a staple of my CD player for well over a year now. He debut some songs from his much anticipated second album and was a true showman with a great set of pipes and a horn soaked band to back him up. Otherwise, we saw parts of sets by rapper Chancellor Warhol and rock group Bear In Heaven whose pop tunes mixed with dance beats sounded pretty good. Then the evacuation came…then the rain came…and then we spent a few hours in the lobby of The Art Institute Of Chicago waiting for the festival to reopen. At that point, a judgment call needed to be made. I had originally planned this day to be a shorter day than the rest since the headliners of Red Hot Chili Peppers, Santigold (both of whom I’ve seen before) and Avicci didn’t really hold much sway. I kind of figured that the afternoon bands I had counted on seeing weren’t going to play afterall (partially true), so I decided to bag the rest of the festival for the day and come home. The festival did reopen at 6:00…so tomorrow’s another day…and Jack White is headlining…

Edited: August 4th, 2012

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – 5/15/12

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Think” by The 5 Royales

If ever a group deserved to be in the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall Of Fame, it should be The 5 Royales. Not only were they a pioneering R’n’B and Doo Wop vocal group, but they had one of the greatest songwriters of the era in Lowman “Pete” Pauling as a member. Pauling wrote most of the Royales’ material and many of their songs went on to be big hits for others. The 5 Royales were formed in North Carolina in the early 1950s and consisted of Lowman “Pete” Pauling, Jimmy Moore, Obadiah Carter, Otto Jeffries and Johnny Tanner. They recorded for King Records and had chart success with songs like “Monkey Hips And Rice,” “Baby Don’t Do It” and “Somebody Help Me.” But it was the songs that were penned by Pauling and recorded by others that really made them legends. The group was responsible for introducing this song that later went on to be a big soul hit for James Brown. They also recorded the original versions of “Dedicated To The One I Love” made famous by both The Shirelles and The Mamas & The Papas, and “Tell The Truth” which was originally recorded by Ray Charles.

Edited: June 14th, 2012

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – 5/12/12

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Disparate Youth” by Santigold

American born Santi White got her start as an A&R rep for Epic Records before joining the band Stiffed who released two punk rock records in the early two-thousands. In 2008 she went solo in a new direction as a singer, songwriter and dance music maven and scored with the hit “Creator” from her self-titled debut album. Many months touring supporting acts like Kanye West, Jay-Z, Bjork and M.I.A. led her to an afternoon Lollapalooza slot in 2009 where I caught her act and realized that she was much more than a product of some record company boardroom. Turns out she’s quite the performer who writes most of her material and seldom needs to lean on auto-tune to make her voice sound good. Several weeks ago she released her sophomore album “Master Of My Make Believe” with an assist from Karen O and Nick Zinner of Yeah Yeah Yeahs to much critical acclaim. She will again be featured at this year’s Lollapalooza Festival.

Edited: May 12th, 2012

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – 5/7/12

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Keep On Truckin’” by Eddie Kendricks from the 1973 album “Eddie Kendricks”

Originally a member of The Primes (to the Supremes’ Primettes), Kendricks possessed one of the most soulful voices in the group that would later be renamed The Temptations. His angelic falsetto voice climbed the charts numerous times on such classics as “Just My Imagination,” “My Girl,” “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg,” “Get Ready” and dozens of others too numerous to mention here. He left the Tempts to go solo in 1971 topping the charts in 1973 with this classic that ushered in the era of Disco. This is the long album version of the song for maximum boogie pleasure!

Edited: May 6th, 2012

Song of the Day by Eric Berman – 4/19/12

Song of the Day by Eric Berman – “Hang Loose” by Alabama Shakes

Sometimes I find I’m way to critical a listener of music. On face value, the Alabama Shakes’ debut album “Boys & Girls” is a fine old-school, STAX-inspired soul record with sturdy songs sung by newcomer powerhouse vocalist Brittany Howard. But here’s where the rub comes…when I hear a record like this that hawks back to an older type of music, I can’t help but wonder are they just emulating the sound…or do they actually feel what they are doing? In the Shakes’ case, it sounds somewhat genuine…but the jaded music industry side of me can’t help wonder if it is all some kind of a concoction dreamt up by some aging A&R guys around a board room table at a record company. I guess I’ve gotta stop thinking so much about the music…and start feeling it myself… Perhaps I should just “Hang Loose.”

Edited: April 18th, 2012

Song Of the Day by Eric Berman – 3/19/12

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Got A Job” by The Miracles

Before there was The Miracles, before there was Berry Gordy and before there was Motown, a talented singer and aspiring songwriter named William Robinson formed a group called The Matadors. The Matadors consisted of Bobby Rogers, Ronnie White, Warren Moore, and Claudette Rogers. They met a hungry promoter named Berry Gordy who had his first taste of success by writing the Jackie Wilson hit “Reet Petite.” The Matadors auditioned for Gordy who liked the group, especially their lead singer. When Williams told Gordy that he could write songs, the two sat down and wrote an answer record to The Silhouettes’ 1958 hit “Get A Job.” Gordy thought the name, The Matadors, was far to masculine for a group that featured a vocalist like William Robinson and also a female vocalist, so he changed their name to The Miracles. Gordy negotiated a release of the record on the independent End record label in 1958 and it became a minor hit. With the money earned from the hit record, Gordy went on to found the Motown record label making Robinson the vice-president…so you may say that both Gordy and Smokey Robinson (as he became known) “Got A Job” with the release of the record of the same name.

Edited: March 18th, 2012

Song Of The Day – 2/22/12

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Ooh Poo Pah Doo” by Jessie Hill

Mardi Gras may be over, but the music keeps rolling on. Jessie Hill was originally a drummer who backed both Professor Longhair and Huey “Piano” Smith before turning to vocals striking and out with his own group, The House Rockers. To further heighten his New Orleans pedigree, this track was produced by none other than Allen Toussaint. After its success in 1960, Hill went on to record more records under his own name while backing fellow New Orleans artists like Mac Rebennack (Dr. John) and Harold Battiste. He also wrote songs recorded by Sonny and Cher, Willie Nelson and Ike and Tina Turner. Hill died at the age of 63 in 1996. His grandson is Troy Andrews better known to most as Trombone Shorty.

Edited: February 22nd, 2012

Song Of The Day – 2/18/12

 

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Thin Line Between Love And Hate” by The Persuaders

Although they were best known for this 1971 million seller, The Persuaders also recorded the original versions of classics like “The Best Thing That Ever Happened To Me” (later covered and brought to the charts by Gladys Knight & The Pips) and “Some Guys Have All The Luck” (covered and charted by Rod Stewart). In fact, The Pretenders remade a super soulful version of “Thin Line” on their debut album in 1980. The Persuaders original lineup included Douglas “Smokey” Scott, James Holland, Willie Holland, Thomas Hill Sr. and Charles Stoghill and they formed in New York in 1969. They continued to score hits through 1973 and record through 2006 with an ever-changing lineup. Here they are in the early 1970s performing the song on “Soul Train.”

Edited: February 17th, 2012

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – 2/6/12

 

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Had You Told It Like It Was (It Wouldn’t Be Like It Is)” by Albert King

Like Jimi Hendrix after him, Albert King had a unique guitar sound due to his playing of a right handed guitar upside down with his left hand. In King’s world, he was pushing up on the strings a righty would normally push down on. His style was an inspiration to the likes of Robert Cray, Stevie Ray Vaughan and Eric Clapton. While he’s best known for his late ’60s STAX Records classics like “Born Under A Bad Sign,” “Cross Cut Saw” and “Laundromat Blues,” this song is from much earlier in his career. He began recording under his own name for the Bobbin Record label whose recordings were leased to King Records for release. In 1962, King released the album “The Big Blues” that featured this R’n’B classic. While sales were meager and the hits were slim, his recordings from this period are every bit as good as the ones he cut for STAX.

Edited: February 6th, 2012

Song Of The Day – 1/31/12

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “I Turned You On” by The Isley Brothers

From gossamer to “grit-tay”…yesterday I featured a track by the smooth soul group, The Delfonics…today we’re going gritty with this funky 1969 track by The Isley Brothers. They were one of the longest running R’n’B groups of all time forming in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1959 and recording and touring together in some form through 2010. At the time of this recording, the group consisted of brothers Ronald, Rudolph and O’Kelly Isley and their cousin Chris Jasper. Brothers Ernie and Marvin were listed as musicians but weren’t full time members of the group yet. They would join as full members in 1973 with the release of their landmark album “3+3″ and the smash hit “That Lady.” The Brothers were responsible for such indelible hits as “Shout,” “Twist And Shout,” “This Old Heart Of Mine (Is Weak For You),” “Black Berries,” “It’s Your Thing,” “Pop That Thang,” “Love The One You’re With,” “Summer Breeze,” “Fight The Power,” “Harvest For The World,” plus many others. This song comes from their 1969 album called “The Brothers: Isley.”

Edited: January 31st, 2012

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – 1/18/12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Joy In Repetition” by Prince

There are guitarist who can play from the head, but rarer are the guitarists who play from the heart….you know, the ones whose emotions are left out hangin’ to dry with each note. Jimi Hendrix did…so did Jerry Garcia and Stevie Ray Vaughan. Derek Trucks sure does and so does Neil Young. Here we have the dynamo known as Prince who is perhaps the greatest living performer we have today. He is certainly one of the best performers I’ve ever seen. His guitar chops are on full display in this live 2002 version of a track that was originally on the 1990 “Graffiti Bridge” soundtrack album. “Bridge” was a crap movie, but it was a great Prince album recorded right before things began to go bad for Prince at Warner Bros. Records. The version of “Joy” heard here was from his “One Nite Alone…Live” box set he self-released in 2002 and was recorded in April of 2002 in New York City.

Edited: January 18th, 2012

Song Of The Day – 1/11/12

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “It Don’t Come Easy” by Bettye LaVette

Bettye LaVette had several deep soul hits back in the early 1960s including the 1962 top-ten “My Man, He’s A Lovin’ Man” and 1965′s “Let Me Down Easy.” She then sank into obscurity for nearly 40 years. She was rediscovered by European soul fans in 2000 resulting in several critically acclaimed comeback albums. Here she is singing her version of the Ringo Starr classic in New York City. She was touring behind her latest album called “Interpretations: The British Rock Songbook” a very daring record she made covering songs by Pink Floyd (“Wish You Were Here”), The Beatles (“The Word”), Eric Clapton (“Why Does Love Got To Be So Bad”), The Who (“Love Reign O’er Me”) and others by The Moody Blues, The Animals, Elton John, Paul McCartney and George Harrison. While she doesn’t improve on many of the songs, she does put her own stamp on them and doesn’t just parrot the original arrangements. A flawed album, perhaps, but the high marks make it all worthwhile.

Edited: January 11th, 2012

Song Of The Day – 1/10/12


 

 

 

 

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Beware Brother Beware” by Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five

Some stone cold advice from Mr. Jordan and company waxed back in 1946. That’s Wild Bill Davis on the piano and, of course, Jordan himself on the vocals and the alto saxophone. When it came to big band, jump blues, jazz and boogie woogie, Jordan was top of the heap ranking just behind Duke Ellington and Count Basie in popularity back in the day. His releases regularly topped the R’n’B “Race” charts and he sent numerous records into the upper regions of the pop charts. Listen closely and you’ll hear the roots of rock ‘n’ roll and rap in this song.

Edited: January 10th, 2012

Song Of The Day – 12/30/11

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “A Case Of You” by Prince

Prince has got balls!  Here he attempts to bring his own special flavor to a cover of a Joni Mitchell classic that originally appeared on the album “Blue.” His version is interesting and certainly carries his own soulful stamp on the proceedings. The recording was part of the “A Tribute To Joni Mitchell” album that came out almost five years ago featuring Elvis Costello, Bjork, Sufjan Stevens, k.d. lang, Emmylou Harris and others taking a chance on a Joni song. While the collection is eclectic and entertaining, one thing is for certain…nobody sings Joni Mitchell like the artist herself…and anybody who thinks they can do better is sadly mistaken.

Edited: December 29th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 11/29/11

Song Of The Day – “Femme Fatale” by Aloe Blacc

You may already know who Aloe Blacc is if you watch the HBO series “How To Make It In America.” It is his “I Need A Dollar” that is used as its theme song. Or perhaps you were a fan of the hip-hop group Emanon in which he was a member. If not, perhaps his soulful take on this Lou Reed/Velvet Underground classic from his 2010 album “Good Things” will make you a fan.

Edited: November 29th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 11/28/11

Song Of The Day – “We Found Love” by Rihanna featuring Calvin Harris

Robyn Rihanna Fenty is one sexy-hot island girl…and she can spin a pretty good tune too! She is one of the most successful recording artists of all time landing eleven records on top of the Billboard singles chart while selling more than 60 million singles and 20 million albums over the last five years. Her latest album, “Talk That Talk,” where this song was culled, is sure to add to her lofty totals.

Edited: November 28th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 11/25/11

Song Of The Day – “Shop Around” by Smokey Robinson and The Miracles

As for me…I am in no rush to get to Target, Best Buy or the Mall. You can keep Black Friday, I think I’ll pass. Except tomorrow is also one of two Independent Record Store Days per year where you’re supposed to show your support by buying some limited pressing of a record only available for a limited time. Guess I’ll sniff around and see what I can find to put up on eBay. In the meantime, this is one of Motown’s and Robinson’s earliest singles chock full of the lyrical cleverness we’ve all come to expect.

Edited: November 24th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 10/29/11

Song Of The Day – “He Said I Can” by Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings

Brand new Bosco Mann-penned single from soul sista no. 1, her funky drummer and the gang! While the song is only available as a 45 rpm single in America, it is also on a UK-only rarities album called “Soul Time.” Let’s hope that “Soul Time” is sooner than later on these shores!

Edited: October 28th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 10/24/11

Song Of The Day – “Going Out Of My Head” by Little Anthony & The Imperials

Jerome Anthony Gourdine (aka Little Anthony) led The Imperials to the pop charts for three decades. Their run of hits began in the late 1950s with “Tears On My Pillow” to this top-ten gem from 1964 right on through to 1977 when Anthony left the group. The song became a pop standard with covers by Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald and many others.

Edited: October 24th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 10/13/11

Song Of The Day – “I’m Going Down” by Rose Royce

Fans of Rose Royce reveled in the voice of Rose Norwalt whose pipes graced this deep soul track from the 1976 “Car Wash” Soundtrack, but her name was actually Gwen Dickey. The song was written by Norman Whitfield and was brought back to the charts in 1994 by Mary J. Blige. X-Factor contestant, Jaslyn Little, tore it up on TV a few weeks ago with this song.

Edited: October 13th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 8/15/11

Song Of The Day – “You’re Still A Young Man” by Tower Of Power

They took us to “Down To The Night Club” in “Bump City” and showed us “What Is Hip”…and it doesn’t get much more soulful than this! TOP was the East Bay horn-fueled brain child of such great musicians as Emilio Castillo and Lenny Pickett as renowned for their own recordings as for the horn work they’ve done for everyone from Santana to PIL.

Edited: August 14th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 7/30/11

Song Of The Day – “Cissy Strut” by The Meters

This 1969 instrumental is practically ground zero for all of Rap and Hip Hop tracks. It’s the essence of songs like this Allen Toussaint-produced classic that informs the genre with its groove and beats. The Meters were formed by Aaron Neville as a backing band for some of New Orleans’ greatest acts like Chris Kenner and Lee Dorsey.

Edited: July 29th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 7/28/11

Song Of The Day – “Turn On Your Love Light” by Bobby “Blue” Bland

Drawing on Soul, Gospel, Big Band and the Blues, Bobby Bland has one of the most expressive voices in R’n’B. The meat of his recorded output was released on the Duke record label between 1952 and 1972. This 1961 classic later became a staple of Grateful Dead shows in the capable hands of “Pigpen” Ron McKernan.

Edited: July 28th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 7/15/11

Song Of The Day – “I Need A Dollar” by Aloe Blacc

When I first heard this song as the theme to HBO’s now-defunct series “How To Make It In America,” I thought it was a long lost song by Gil Scott-Heron. Turns out it was Los Angeles born neo-soul singer Aloe Blacc, and the song was from his latest record “Good Things.” Check out some of his “Ol’ Blacc Magic!”

 

Edited: July 15th, 2011

Michael Jackson – Two Years On…

Michael Jackson – Two years later and one horrible posthumous release in the form of last year’s turgid “Michael” album.  Let’s remember him for his greatness like “I Can’t Let Her Get Away” from his “Dangerous” album.

Edited: June 25th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 6/16/11

Song Of The Day: “Five Guys Named Moe” by Louis Jordan & His Tympani Five

Between the years 1942 and 1951, Louis Jordan placed 57 different records on the R’n’B charts. He was an accomplished songwriter, saxophone player and entertainer. This gem, recorded in 1942, went on to be the title tune of a hit Broadway review and was brought back by Joe Jackson on his “Jumpin’ Jive” album in 1980.

Edited: June 16th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 6/14/11

Song Of The Day – “Crossword Puzzle” by Sly Stone

This one comes from Sly Stone’s oft-neglected 1975 album “High On You.” Yes, it was the beginning of the end for Sly’s relevance, but this album still offers plenty of good listening. Hip-Hop aficionados will recognize the indelible horn riffs from De La Soul’s “Say No Go” featured on their classic album “3 Feet High And Rising.”

Edited: June 14th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 6/13/11

Song Of The Day – “There He Is (At My Door)” by The Vells

The Vells featured a secretary from Motown who was asked to fill in at a session for an absent Mary Wells. That gave Martha Reeves her big break that led to singing background on Marvin Gaye’s “Pride And Joy” and eventually to this early recording from 1962. The following year, the newly-named Martha & The Vandellas scored with “(Love Is Like A) Heat Wave.”

Edited: June 13th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 6/8/11

Song Of The Day – “Shake/A Fool In Love/It’s Gonna Work Out Fine” by Ike & Tina Turner

Music history hasn’t been kind to Ike Turner. Instead of being remembered as a songwriter extraordinaire, pioneer of R’n’B and a great guitarist, he’s primarily remembered for beating on Tina. No doubt, his dubious personal life has overshadowed his contributions to music.  Here is some early Ike & Tina on the TNT Show.

Edited: June 8th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 6/6/11

Song Of The Day – “I Got Loaded” by Little Bob & The Lollipops

Although his sound is steeped in New Orleans rhythm and blues, Camille Bob (aka Little Bob) hails from Lafayette Louisiana where he can still be seen gigging around today. Word to the wise: Take two aspirin and drink a big glass of water after listenin’ to this one!

Edited: June 6th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 4/18/11

Song Of The Day – “Willie And The Hand Jive” by The Johnny Otis Show

You can keep Clapton’s limp dishrag version of this song…here’s the real deal! Otis was a bandleader, record label owner, record producer, disc jockey and a TV show personality. His son is none other than guitarist Shuggie Otis.

Edited: April 18th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 4/2/11

Song Of The Day – “Yes We Can Can” by The Pointer Sisters

This Allen Toussaint-penned gem comes from the Pointer’s debut album from 1973.  It’s infectious…it’s funky…it’s contagious…it’s been often sampled, but never improved upon!

Edited: April 1st, 2011

Song Of The Day – 3/22/11

Song Of The Day – “Once You Get Started/Stop On By” by Rufus featuring Chaka Khan

A duo of songs from the 1974 album “Rufisized” performed live on the Mike Douglas Show in 1975. What can be said of Chaka Khan that hasn’t been said already…dynamo performer…dynamite set of pipes! No need for auto-tuned vocals here…nothing processed…everything is real down ‘n’ dirty groove. Little known fact…Rufus with Chaka Khan grew out of the ashes of Chicago group The American Breed who scored a hit in 1968 with “Bend Me Shape Me.” Side note: How Mike Douglas managed to keep his job as talk show host is totally beyond me. What a buffoon…

Edited: March 22nd, 2011

Song Of The Day – 3/13/11

Song Of the Day – “Cry Cry Cry” by Bobby “Blue” Bland from the 1961 album “Two Steps From The Blues”

Soulful song from a solid album by one of the blues’ greatest voices. Nuff said!

Edited: March 12th, 2011

Song Of The Day – 3/8/11

Song Of the Day – “Yellow Moon” by The Neville Brothers

Fat Tuesday is upon us and I do believe a “Yellow Moon” is rising. From New Orleans’ first musical family – Aaron, Art, Charles and Cyril – comes this Daniel Lanois-produced track from 1989 featuring equal doses of swamp and funk. For those who are contemplating Lent…don’t give up the funk!

Edited: March 8th, 2011

PURE SOUL!

Edited: February 16th, 2011