Posts Tagged ‘I’m Telling You Now’

Song of the Day by Eric Berman – “Things Will Never Be the Same” by Four Just Men

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Song of the Day by Eric Berman – “Things Will Never Be the Same” by Four Just Men

I recently wrote about Freddie & The Dreamers’ single, “I’m Telling You Now,” and the American album of the same name. The record was not a Freddie & The Dreamers album per se, although they were the featured group on the cover. It was a compilation released in 1965 to introduce unknown British Invasion groups to American audiences featuring two tracks each by Freddie & The Dreamers, Mike Rabin & The Demons, The Toggery Five, Linda Laine & The Sinners, Heinz and the group whose song is today’s Song Of The Day by Eric Berman, Four Just Men.

Four Just Men were one of the better groups to ride on the coattails of The Beatles and The British Invasion, and while their output was miniscule to say the least, it was indeed potent.

They were a Merseybeat group whose original name was Dee Fenton & the Silhouettes. Upon changing their name to Four Just Men in 1964, they were signed by George Martin who produced several non-charting British singles for them in 1964 through 1965. The group’s two Parlophone singles were “Things Will Never Be the Same” b/w “That’s My Baby (which were the two songs on the U.S. compilation album) and “There’s Not One Thing” b/w “Don’t Come Any Closer.” Both singles were originals, written by singer-guitarist Dimitrius Christopholus and guitarist John Kelman. The group changed their name yet again, this time to Just Four Men after another band also calling themselves Four Just Men threatened to sue EMI.

While the group toured with The Rolling Stones, The Searchers and Del Shannon in support of the two singles neither charted and they were dropped by EMI. They resurfaced in 1966 as a psychedelic group called Wimple Winch, who was known for the local hits “Rumble on Mersey Square South” and “Save My Soul.”

The two Four Just Men singles, as well as eight previously unreleased tracks from the era and 16 songs by Wimple Winch, were released on the now out of print import CD, The Wimple Story 1963-1968.

Edited: December 10th, 2014

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – 2/24/13

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “Things Will Never Be The Same” by Four Just Men

Last week I wrote about Freddie & The Dreamers single, “I’m Telling You Now,” and the American album of the same name. The record was not a Freddie & The Dreamers album per se, although they were the featured group on the cover. It was a compilation released in 1965 to introduce unknown British Invasion groups to American audiences featuring two tracks each by Freddie & The Dreamers, Mike Rabin & The Demons, The Toggery Five, Linda Laine & The Sinners, Heinz and the group whose song is today’s Song Of The Day, Four Just Men.

Four Just Men were one of the better groups to ride on the coattails of The Beatles and The British Invasion, and while their output was miniscule to say the least, it was indeed potent.

They were a Merseybeat group whose original name was Dee Fenton & The Silhouettes. Upon changing their name to Four Just Men in 1964, they were signed by George Martin who produce several non-charting British singles for them in 1964 through 1965. The group’s two Parlophone singles were “Things Will Never Be The Same” b/w “That’s My Baby (which were the two songs on the U.S. compilation album) and “There’s Not One Thing” b/w “Don’t Come Any Closer.”  Both singles were originals, written by singer-guitarist Dimitrius Christopholus and guitarist John Kelman.  They changed their name yet again, this time to Just Four Men after another band also calling themselves Four Just Men threatened to sue EMI.

While the group toured with The Rolling Stones, The Searchers and Del Shannon in support of the two singles, neither charted and they were dropped by EMI, only to resurface in 1966 as a psychedelic group called Wimple Winch, who were known for the local hits “Rumble On Mersey Square South” and “Save My Soul.”

The two Four Just Men singles, as well as eight previously unreleased tracks from the era and 16 songs by Wimple Winch were released on the now out of print import CD The Wimple Story 1963-1968.

Edited: February 24th, 2013

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – 2/11/13

Song Of The Day by Eric Berman – “I’m Telling You Now” by Freddie & The Dreamers

I’m writing this on the 49th anniversary of The Beatles historic first performance on The Ed Sullivan Show, and while I have a vague memory of The Beatles playing on Sullivan, I don’t think it was their very first performance. Well, heck, I must have only been four or five years old. But even then, I do remember there was a sense of importance about the event in my house, because of my older sister, who made it that way.

Some of my earliest memories of the British Invasion include albums by the Herman’s Hermits including “Mrs. Brown You’ve Got A Lovely Daughter” and “I’m Henry The VIII,” and today’s Song Of The Day by Freddie & The Dreamers, “I’m Telling You Now.”  In fact, I have a distinct memory of my sister playing her copy of the album that is pictured with this piece, and teaching my brother and I how to do “The Freddie.”

It was pure show biz. The wacky dance performed by Freddie Garrity, with his hands and legs flailing to and fro. The vapid, comedic mugging. The maniacal laugh that bordered on the annoying. The geeky glasses.  The matching tailored suits. – They were just what American teens demanded in 1964 at the height of the British Invasion, when all things British was all the rage.

Garrity was an ex-milkman from Manchester, England when he joined forces in 1963 with Roy Crewdson on guitar, Derek Quinn also on guitar and harmonica, Peter Birrell on bass and Bernie Dwyer on drums, to form Freddie & The Dreamers.

They were much bigger in their native England where they scored four chart hits, to their two in America which included the chart-topping “I’m Telling You Now,” and its number 18 follow-up, “Do The Freddie,” which capitalized on Garrity’s manic stage gyrations by turning it into a dance craze.

Perhaps critic Lester Bangs summed it up best when he said in The Rolling Stone History Of Rock& Roll, “Freddie and the Dreamers [had] no masterpiece but a plentitude [sic] of talentless idiocy and enough persistence to get four albums and one film soundtrack released … the Dreamers looked as thuggish as Freddie looked dippy … Freddie and the Dreamers represented a triumph of rock as cretinous swill, and as such should be not only respected, but given their place in history.”

Edited: February 10th, 2013

Song Of The Day – 4/22/11

It’s time to give Freddie Garrity some props.  No, he wasn’t John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison…or even Ringo Starr…but he was responsible for this 1964 British Invasion chart-topping gem and the “Do The Freddie” dance craze!

For your further enjoyment: “Do The Freddie” by Freddie & The Dreamers

Edited: April 22nd, 2011